In the past rupture (where there may be a hole in the shell of the implant) was a common problem seen by many plastic surgeons.

However modern implants are much less likely to do this as the quality of the outer shell of the implants has improved and the inner gel is more cohesive (ie silicone particles stick to each other like a set jelly).

In the unfortunate situation of a silicone implant rupture: the majority of cases we find that the silicone gel will remain within the capsule (or fibrous tissue) that the body forms around the prosthesis over time. The general consensus is that there patients do not require removal.

Often patients may undergo routine breast cancer screening and we may find that the implants have ruptured but that patients are totally asymptomatic.

Occasionally silicone gel may spread outside the capsule into the surrounding tissues and lymph nodes where it can create lumps (as being seen by PIP implants). These defective implants need to be removed and replaced.

Even in the event of silicone leakage: an Independent review by MHRA has concluded that medical grade silicone is totally safe. It is important to remember that silicone is frequently used in the body in many other ways such as wrapping silicone around cardiac pacemakers.